Thursday, November 19, 2015

Facing The Difficult Task Of Making Living Wills (part 2 of 2)
* The date should be indicated and notarization must be done, if the state requires it.

* The directives contained in the living will should be consistent with the laws of a particular state. In general, they should relate to cases wherein the owner/maker has been diagnosed of a terminal disease, or has been comatose for a period that's long enough to be considered permanent and any medical intervention would only function to maintain or prolong the current vegetative state.

As much as possible, you should tell your family or closest friends about your living will. You may even assign somebody to act or make decisions on your behalf in case you become incapacitated.

In addition, copies of the living will should be given to the owner/maker's family members, the attending physician, the hospital/nursing home, and other persons involved in the medical care. A duplicate may also be submitted to a living will registry that will take care of the necessary distribution for a certain fee.

Living wills may also be changed or modified. In case you ever decide to make necessary changes, you should notify and furnish copies to all the recipients of your previous living will. Aside from that, all copies of the former document should be consequently destroyed.

The preparation of living wills is a naturally emotional matter. Even a calm and sensible person may find it difficult to fully concentrate on the task.

That is why it is important to get all the possible assistance – both professionally and emotionally – when drafting a legal document such as this one.

No comments:

Post a Comment